Friday, November 29, 2019

Westconnex Truck on Norton Street contrary to conditions of approval

Caught this westconnex truck trundling down Norton Street today - wasn't quick enough to get the number of the truck but reported anyway as I doubt Norton Street is a legitimate route.

Appendix B1Traffic and Transport and Access Management Sub-Plan
M4-M5 Link Mainline Tunnels June 2019 is at https://www.westconnex.com.au/sites/default/files/M4-M5%20Link%20Tunnels_TTAMP.pdf

Conditions from NSW Government
Department of Planning and Environment
Conditions of Approval for WestConnex M4-M5 Link SSI 7485
SSI 7485 MOD 1 determined 25 February 2019

Westconnex Truck Parramatta Road, 8 Nov 2019
A44 All construction spoil haulage vehicles must be clearly marked as being for WestConnex M4-M5 Link (including CSSI application number) in such a manner to enable immediate identification within at least 50 metres of the vehicles.
....

E52 Construction vehicles (including staff vehicles) associated with the CSSI must be managed to:
(a) minimise parking on public roads;
(b) minimise idling and queuing on public roads; and
(c) ensure spoil haulage vehicles must adhere to the nominated haulage routes identified in the Traffic and Transport CEMP.

E53 The locations of all construction spoil haulage vehicles must be able to be monitored in real time and the records of monitoring be made available electronically to the Secretary and the EPA upon request for a period of no less than one year following construction.
Note: Refer to Condition A44 in relation to vehicle identification. 


E49 Spoil haulage vehicles associated with the construction of the CSSI are not permitted to use local roads within one (1) kilometre of construction works and construction ancillary facilities, unless otherwise approved by the Secretary.

45E 49A Use of Route A as the primary route for spoil haulage from the Northcote Street construction ancillary facility is limited to the first two (2) months of spoil haulage commencing at the Northcote Street facility or once the G-Loop is operational, whichever is the sooner, unless an alternative

time period is agreed to by the Planning Secretary. During this time period, spoil haulage vehicles are permitted to use Route A only between the hours of 7:00 am and 7:00 pm.

E49B Once the G-Loop is operational, use of Route A by spoil haulage vehicles is limited to the following circumstances:

(a) during the hours of 7:00 am to 9:00 am and 4:00 pm to 6:00 pm Monday to Friday (excluding public holidays) and 8:00 am to 9:00 am and 4:00 pm to 6:00 pm on Saturdays;

(b) during periods of maintenance and/or unserviceability of the G-Loop (such as repairs, signal failure, unauthorised standing of vehicles);

(c) in the event that there is an incident or maintenance works on the road network in the vicinity of the Northcote Street construction ancillary facility and the G-Loop that prevents spoil haulage vehicles from accessing or travelling on Route B;

(d) in the event that there is insufficient capacity for a spoil haulage vehicle to enter the Northcote Street construction ancillary facility and it must bypass the access gate; and

(e) in peak spoil generating period(s) of no greater than six months approved by the Planning Secretary.

Notwithstanding the above, the use of Route A is restricted to 7:00 am to 7:00 pm daily.

E49C The Proponent must submit to the Planning Secretary the following information when seeking the approval of the Planning Secretary under Condition E49B(e):

(a) the estimated dates and duration of the peak spoil generating period;

(b) the estimated hourly number of spoil haulage vehicle trips on Route A both during and outside the hours specified in Condition E49B(a) each day during the peak spoil generating period;

(c) at least six months of data as specified in Condition E49D(a) and (b); and

(d) analysis of the operational performance of the G-Loop, including the need to restrict the use of the G-Loop during the hours identified in Condition E49B(a).

E49D Within four (4) months following the commencement of tunnelling at the Northcote Street construction ancillary facility, and at three (3) monthly intervals thereafter until the completion of tunnelling and backfilling from that site, the Proponent must submit to the Secretary data which details on an hourly basis:

(a) the total number of spoil haulage vehicle trips associated with tunnelling and backfilling at the Northcote Street construction ancillary facility (inbound and outbound); and

(b) the number of trips (times) spoil haulage vehicles have used Route A, and Wattle Street / Parramatta Road (instead of the M4 East Motorway tunnels) when exiting the G-Loop, including the dates and times of use as well as the reasons for use of these routes noting the criteria for use specified in Condition E49B.

**************

Notes: For the purposes of Conditions E49A and E49B:

1. Spoil haulage vehicles includes vehicles removing spoil from the Northcote Street construction ancillary facility during tunnelling and delivering spoil to the site to backfill the construction access tunnel;

2. Route A from the Northcote Street construction ancillary facility is left turn onto Wattle Street, left turn on Ramsay Street, left turn on Fairlight Street, left turn on Great North Road; and

3. Route B from the Northcote Street construction ancillary facility is left turn onto Wattle Street, continue along Wattle Street/Dobroyd Parade and left turn into G-Loop, right-hand turn onto Dobroyd Parade from G-Loop, continue along Dobroyd Parade / Wattle Street into M4 East tunnel or onto Parramatta Road.

46Construction vehicles must not use Robert Street, Rozelle to access the White Bay Civil Site.

E50A All heavy vehicles must only access and exit the Parramatta Road East and Parramatta Road West construction ancillary facilities via Parramatta Road during the operation of the facilities, except for when exiting the Parramatta Road West site and they need to travel east. In these circumstances the site may be exited via Bland Street or as otherwise approved by the Planning Secretary.

All requests to the Secretary for local road usage need to include a traffic and pedestrian impact assessment, and should include a swept path analysis if required. The traffic and pedestrian impact assessment, incorporated in the Site Establishment Management Plan or Traffic and Transport CEMP as relevant, must:

(a) demonstrate that the local road usage will not compromise the safety of the public and have minimal amenity impacts;

(b) provide details as to the date of completion of the road dilapidation surveys for the subject local roads; and

(c) describe the measures that will be implemented to avoid where practicable the use of local roads past schools, aged care facilities and child care facilities during peak times for operation.

Construction vehicles (including staff vehicles) associated with the CSSI must be managed to:

(a) minimise parking on public roads;

(b) minimise idling and queuing on public roads; and

(c) ensure spoil haulage vehicles must adhere to the nominated haulage routes identified in the Traffic and Transport CEMP.

The locations of all construction spoil haulage vehicles must be able to be monitored in real time and the records of monitoring be made available electronically to the Secretary and the EPA upon request for a period of no less than one year following construction.

Note: Refer to Condition A44 in relation to vehicle identification.

A Construction Parking and Access Strategy must be prepared and implemented to identify and mitigate impacts resulting from on- and off-street parking changes during construction of the CSSI. The Strategy must include, but not necessarily be limited to:

(a) confirmation and timing of the removal of on- and off-street parking associated with construction of the CSSI;

(b) parking surveys of all parking spaces to be removed to determine current demand during peak, off-peak, school drop off and pickup, and weekend periods;

(c) consultation with affected stakeholders utilising existing on- and off-street parking stock which will be impacted as a result of construction;

(d) assessment of the impacts of changes to on- and off-street parking stock taking into consideration outcomes of consultation with affected stakeholders;

(e) identification of mitigation measures to manage impacts to stakeholders as a result of on- and off-street parking changes including, but not necessarily limited to, staged removal and replacement of parking, provision of alternative parking arrangements, managed staff parking arrangements and working with relevant council(s) to introduce parking restrictions adjacent to work sites and compounds;

(f) provision of a shuttle bus service(s) to transport workers to site(s) and details of the shuttle bus service(s), including service timing and frequency;

(g) mechanisms for monitoring, over appropriate intervals, to determine the effectiveness of implemented mitigation measures;


47(h) provision of contingency measures should the results of mitigation monitoring indicate implemented measures are ineffective; and

(i) provision of reporting of monitoring results to the Secretary and relevant council(s) at three (3) monthly intervals.


The Construction Parking and Access Strategy must be submitted to the Secretary for approval at least one (1) month prior to the commencement of any works that impact parking. Source (viewed 29 Nov 2019):
https://www.westconnex.com.au/sites/default/files/WestConnex%20M4-M5%20Link%20MOD%201_Consolidated%20Instrument%20of%20Approval.pdf

 
One of at least two Westconnex M4 East Stage 1 Trucks (and Stage 1 marking)  caught where it should not have been on Marion Street Leichhardt after turning from Elswick St on 12 Feb 2018


Wednesday, November 27, 2019

Croydon Road Pedestrian Refuges

C1017 Item 14 Motion: Notice of Motion: Pedestrian Safety on Croydon Road, Croydon (Da Cruz/Porteous) October 2017 following meeting with locals in August 2017..https://perambuler.ramin.com.au/2019/02/croydon-road-pedestrian-safety.html

Next challenge is more trees...

Croydon Road, at Church St 9 Nov 2019
Croydon Road, at Church St 9 Nov 2019


Croydon Road, at Queen St, 9 Nov 2019
Queen St at Jones St 18 Nov 2019

Croydon Road, at Gregory Avenue 9 November 2019
Croydon Road and Anthony Street Intersection 18 Nov 2019


More at https://perambuler.ramin.com.au/2019/11/work-commences-on-croydon-road.html

Air Quality and Carbon Emissions in the Inner West

Update: Marrickville West primary school called a SNAP Action to highlight the health risks of the air pollution in Sydney. Orange Grove followed Suit. Also action at Dulwich Hill Primary. 

Media Coverage:

https://www.abc.net.au/radio/newsradio/record-pollution-in-nsw-a-health-risk-for-school/

https://www.sbs.com.au/news/the-feed/parents-worried-that-schools-aren-t-equipped-for-hazardous-bushfire-air-quality

The Marrickville Primary action led to action at Orange Grove covered by SMH https://www.smh.com.au/environment/climate-change/there-is-no-excuse-parents-and-students-demand-climate-action-20191212-p53j8h.html

https://soundcloud.com/radio-skid-row/snap-actions-in-protest-against-air-pollution-at-marrickville-west-and-orange-grove-w-kobi-shetty

Inner West Council Climate and Renewables Strategy with Anna Harvey 12/12/2019 https://soundcloud.com/radio-skid-row/inner-west-council-climate-and-renewables-strategy-with-anna-harvey-12122019 

Snap actions in protest against air pollution at Marrickville West and Orange Grove w Kobi Shetty https://soundcloud.com/radio-skid-row/snap-actions-in-protest-against-air-pollution-at-marrickville-west-and-orange-grove-w-kobi-shetty

Council Meeting: 26 November 2019

Not surprised the liberal councillor did not support my Notice of Motion but disappointed that Labor didn't either even after I accepted pted their incoroporated their foreshadoew motion (to establish a fund) as an amendment.

Thankyou to Ms Harvey for coming to speak to council with her baby.

The air pollution in the Inner West is excacerbated by the Bush Fires but the fumes from Diesel Trucks and buses, Cruise and Concrete Ships is also a significant source of pollutants.


Item No: C1119(2) Item 17
Subject: Notice of Motion: Bushfire/Climate Change
From: Councillor Marghanita Da Cruz



THAT Council:


1. Recognises that the catostrophic fire conditions, and the bushfires, are a result of Climate Change caused be greenhouse gas emissions from the burning of coal, oil and gas;


2. Notes that the smoke from bushfires and the burning of coal, oil and gas reduces the air quality in the Inner West affecting the health of our residents and does what we can to reduce emissions from our operations by rapidly improving our Energy Efficiency and transioning to Electric Fleet.


3. Writes to the Prime Minister Scott Morrison and the Leader of the Opposition Anthony Albanese calling on them to:

a) Rapidly phase out the burning of coal, oil and gas which is generating the greenhouse gases;


b) Prepare Australian communities, health and emergency services for escalating fire danger; and


c) Recognise traditional knowledge in particular the use of fire and expand the Indigenous Rangers program and ways to incorporate this knowledge and skills into our land management


4. Writes to the Premier and Leader of the Opposition in NSW calling for a halt to the ongoing budget cuts to the National Parks and Wildlife Service which have severely limited its ability to carry out hazard reduction and fight wildfires

BACKGROUND


Climate Council: This is Not Normal’: Climate change and escalating bushfire risk Key Findings
  1. The catastrophic, unprecedented fire conditions currently affecting NSW and Queensland have been aggravated by climate change.Bushfire risk was exacerbated by record breaking drought, very dry fuels and soils, and record- breaking heat.
  2. Bushfire conditions are now more dangerous than in the past. The risks to people and property have increased and fire seasons have lengthened. It is becoming more dangerous to fight fires in Australia.
  3. The fire season has lengthened so substantially that it has already reduced opportunities for fuel reduction burning. This means it is harder to prepare for worsening conditions.
  4. The costs of fighting fires are increasing. Australia relies on resource sharing arrangements between countries and states and territories within Australia. As seasons overlap and fires become more destructive, governments will be increasingly constrained in their ability to share resources and the costs of tackling fires will increase.
  5. The government must develop an urgent plan to (1) prepare Australian communities, health and emergency services for escalating fire danger; and (2) rapidly phase out the burning of coal oil and gas which is driving more dangerous fires.

Source: https://www.climatecouncil.org.au/…/CC-nov-Bushfire-briefin… paper.pdf


Statement from Australian Mayors: Climate Change has grave costs for our community that can no longer be ignored

The fires this week in Australia have placed hundreds of thousands of people in great danger. The catastrophic conditions for these fires were, at least in part, fuelled by climate change.

13 of the 14 hottest years on record have occurred this century. Last year Queensland experienced catastrophic fire conditions for the first time. This week, Sydney experienced catastrophic fire conditions for the first time.
Climate change has grave costs for our community that can no longer be ignored. The fires on across Australia this week have caused catastrophic damage.

In the past week, people have lost their lives, their loved ones, and their homes.

Many businesses have lost the ability to operate and trade.
Our air has been filled with smoke, making it hard to breathe and affecting thousands of people with respiratory issues.

Fire seasons are now starting earlier and lasting longer. Apart from the stress this takes on first responders and communities, it also results in a shrinking window to carry out hazard reduction burns.

Now, it is time to honestly and bravely address one of the major causes of these fires, climate change.

Now we need to significantly increase funding to frontline services.

Now we need to place the welfare and safety of citizens ahead of profit, and to support those companies offering real solutions

Some regional towns are already running out of water. How will they survive the next fire? Many in the insurance industry are saying that large areas of Australia will be uninsurable.

This government has the chance to be the first to turn the years of inaction and neglect into action and focus and allow our communities to reap the rewards
When we have a crisis, it makes sense for us to listen to emergency service professionals

Now, it makes sense for our federal government to listen to the warnings of those on the frontline.

We need the government to acknowledge the link between climate change and bushfire, we need more funding for all emergency services, and we need the government to take the action required to prevent megafires.
Now is not the time for blame. Now is the time for leadership, and keeping all Australians safe.

This joint statement is signed by:
· Tony Wellington, Mayor Noosa Shire Council
· Simon Richardson, Mayor Byron Shire
· Claire Pontin, Deputy Mayor MidCoast Council
· Dominic King, Mayor Bellingen Shire Council
· Katie Milne, Mayor Tweed Shire
· Amanda Findlay, Mayor Shoalhaven City Council
· Clover Moore, Lord Mayor City of Sydney
· Elly Bird, Deputy Mayor Lismore City Council
· Jerome Laxale, Mayor City of Ryde
· Barry Calvert, Mayor Hawkesbury City Council
· Emma Heyde, Councillor Hornsby Shire Council
· Mark Greenhill, Mayor Blue Mountains City Council

Indigenous Fire Management

The Kimberley Land Council’s Indigenous fire management program is extremely important to the biodiversity of the environmentally significant Kimberley region.


Highly skilled Indigenous rangers use traditional knowledge and techniques, together with modern science and technology, to fight fire with fire and reduce the likelihood of large uncontrolled wildfires.

Background

Aboriginal people in the Kimberley have been undertaking traditional fire management for thousands of years. However, with the onset of colonisation and the removal of Aboriginal people from traditional lands, traditional burning was largely stopped during the twentieth century. This led to the emergence of large, uncontrolled wildfires, usually occurring late in the dry season and destroying important ecosystems and habitats. Often these late dry season wildfires impact grazing pasture, infrastructure and other assets.


In the last 25 years, with the introduction of native title and the recognition that western fire prevention methods have not been working effectively, we are now seeing a reinvigoration of traditional fire management in the Kimberley and all across northern Australia.

How does Indigenous fire management work?
Indigenous fire management involves the lighting of ‘cool’ fires in targeted areas during the early dry season between March and July.


The fires burn slowly, reducing fuel loads and creating fire breaks. Not all the area is burnt, with the end result a mosaic of burnt and unburnt country. This creates a similar landscape to when Kimberley Aboriginal People walked the country and burnt as they went for hunting, ceremony and other cultural purposes.


The method removes fuel for larger fires late in the dry season when the weather is very hot, at the same time as maintaining and protecting habitat for mammals, reptiles, insects and birds.


There are other organisations and government departments such as Department of Parks and Wildlife, Department of Fire and Emergency Services, Australian Wildlife Conservancy and Pastoralists that manage fire in the Kimberley by carrying out early dry season prescribed burning.
Source: https://www.klc.org.au/indigenous-fire-management


Indigenous fire methods protect land before and after the Tathra bushfire

“On a hot, dry day in March 2018, 20 separate wildfires ignited across the Bega Valley in New South Wales.

One fire that began at Reedy Swamp north of the town of Bega tore through close to 1,000 hectares before reaching the beachside township of Tathra.

Six months on, a forest of bare, blackened trees frames the town, where more than 100 homes were destroyed or damaged.

But on a small patch of bushland on the south-western edge of Tathra, a patch of green shows where the fire came to a halt.

The land is part of 71 hectares owned by the Bega Local Aboriginal Land Council (LALC) at Tathra West.

The title to the land was transferred in 2016, 17 years after it was granted to the Bega LALC under the Aboriginal Land Rights Act process.

In 2017, the Bega LALC began a cultural burning program as part of the management strategy for their landholdings. “

Source: ABC South East NSW by Vanessa Milton,Updated 18 Sep 2018, 2:09pm, https://www.abc.net.au/…/indigenous-burning-before…/10258140

Update (26 November 2019) Inner West Council Agenda Item No: C1119(2) Item 17Subject: Notice of Motion: Bushfire/Climate Change
From: Councillor Marghanita Da Cruz

The Bushfires in NSW have seen the tragic loss of human life, stock and wildlife. With many more injured and in emergency shelter. Hundreds of homes and other property has been destroyed. Fires are also burning in other states.

Emergency air quality monitoring is being undertaken in Port Macquarie, Grafton, Coffs Harbour, Taree and other areas of northern NSW, including Coffs Harbour, the Northern Rivers region and Port Macquarie is being affected by extensive smoke from bushfires.

EPA has an air quality montoring station in Callan Park and Ports has one at the White Bay Cruise terminal.Westconnex is also required to monitor and report on air quality.

A health warning has been issued for Sydney air quality for Tue 26 November 2019 which is forecast to be POOR due to PARTICLES HEALTH MESSAGE: Unhealthy for sensitive people, and could cause symptoms, especially in people with heart or lung disease.

Inner West Residents have purchased their own air quality monitors and the data is available on a German Website. The website uses the American Air Quality Index which is different to the NSW health department’s guidelines.

Bushfire smoke is a mixture of different-sized particles, water vapour and gases, including carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxides. https://www.qld.gov.au/…/bus…/bushfire-smoke-and-your-health

 SMH November 19, 2019: "Paramedics have treated more than 50 people for asthma and breathing-related incidents since 6am as health authorities are warning residents of serious health risks resulting from thick bushfire smoke on Tuesday." https://www.smh.com.au/…/sydney-blanketed-in-dense-bushfire…

The Public Service Association says hazard reduction targets haven’t been met because of the severe cuts to staffing levels. Since 2011, the department’s 289 rangers, including 28 senior rangers, had been trimmed to 193. In 2017, the NPWS’s number of area managers were cut from 50 to 37 and there have the National Parks service is absorbing part of the $80m cut to the department of environment (within the super ministry of planning and industry) – Danger of cutbacks to rangers burns NSW Deputy Premier John Barilaro, The Australian 10:08AM November 13, 2019 https://www.theaustralian.com.au/…/546160173b4418e19b5caaf4…

SMH, November 15, 2019: NPWS lost many experienced firefighters and planners in recent years, those remaining were often tied up in training newcomers. https://www.smh.com.au/…/misleading-government-accused-of-h…

Sources of Air Pollution (ANSTO): " This demonstration project has found that up to half of the total sulfate air pollution in the greater Sydney region can be attributed to emissions from NSW’s eight coal-fired power stations. Despite being located many kilometres outside of the greater Sydney metropolitan area, these coal-fired power stations have a significant impact on air quality in the CBD areas of Sydney." https://www.ansto.gov.au/…/revealing-sources-of-sydney%E2%8…

RMS: "Diesel vehicles produce up to 80 per cent of 'total suspended particulates' emissions from motor vehicles in Sydney, even though they account for only 15 per cent of vehicle kilometres travelled." - https://www.rms.nsw.gov.au/…/vehicle-…/diesel-emissions.html

CLEAN AIR FOR NSW (2016): "Around 12% of all new heavy vehicles registered in NSW in the first quarter of 2016 were registered to government and a greater proportion of the NSW heavy vehicle fleet is either engaged on government projects or owned by private companies that want government work.
Vehicles are a major source of air pollution in major urban areas, with 62% of NO x , 24% of VOCs and 14% of fine particle pollution (PM 2.5 ) in Sydney coming from vehicles. NO x and VOCs are precursors to ozone formation and photochemical smog.

 PM 2.5 contributes directly to PM concentrations and population exposure. NSW experiences exceedances of the national ambient ozone and particle standards in most years." CONSULTATION PAPER CLEAN AIR FOR NSW, October 2016 https://www.epa.nsw.gov.au/…/…/air/clean-air-nsw-160415.ashx

According to the Adapt NSW Website, the effects of climate change will include:

Monday, November 25, 2019

Air Quality deteriorates in the Inner West

The Bushfires in NSW have seen the tragic loss of human life, stock and wildlife.
Hundreds of homes and other property has been destroyed.


US Air Quality Index in the Inner West -10.55am on Thursday 21 November 2019  deutschland.maps.luftdaten.info


Today, emergency air quality monitoring is being undertaken in Port Macqaurie, Grafton, Coffs Harbour and Taree with warnings to other areas. in Northern NSW due to the bushfires.

The above map shows that air quality in the Inner West was poor. This was attributed to bush fire smoke. However, there are a large number of diesel trucks travelling to and from the Westconnex sites at Haberfield, Rozelle and Annandale. It was quite likely there were cruise and concrete ships at White Bay and Circular Quay. There are also a large number of diesel buses.

Bushfire smoke is a mixture of different-sized particles, water vapour and gases, including carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxides. https://www.qld.gov.au/health/staying-healthy/environmental/after-a-disaster/bushfires/bushfire-smoke-and-your-health 

SMH November 19, 2019: "Paramedics have treated more than 50 people for asthma and breathing-related incidents since 6am as health authorities are warning residents of serious health risks resulting from thick bushfire smoke on Tuesday." https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/sydney-blanketed-in-dense-bushfire-smoke-amid-severe-fire-danger-20191119-p53bt2.html


"Diesel vehicles produce up to 80 per cent of 'total suspended particulates' emissions from motor vehicles in Sydney, even though they account for only 15 per cent of vehicle kilometres travelled."  - https://www.rms.nsw.gov.au/about/environment/air/vehicle-emissions/diesel-emissions.html

 "Around 12% of all new heavy vehicles registered in NSW in the first quarter of 2016 were registered to government and a greater proportion of the NSW heavy vehicle fleet is either engaged on government projects or owned by private companies that want government work. Vehicles are a major source of air
pollution in major urban areas, with 62% of NO x , 24% of VOCs and 14% of fine particle pollution (PM 2.5 ) in Sydney coming from vehicles. NO x and VOCs are precursors to ozone formation and photochemical smog.
PM 2.5 contributes directly to PM concentrations and population exposure. NSW experiences exceedances of the national ambient ozone and particle standards in most years." CONSULTATION PAPER CLEANAIR FOR NSW, October 2016  https://www.epa.nsw.gov.au/~/media/EPA/Corporate%20Site/resources/air/clean-air-nsw-160415.ashx
Air Quality in Sydney was bad last week - particularly on Tuesday and Thursday. Winds were expected to clear the air but despite blowing in did not. 

Sydney air quality for Sat 23 November 2019
is forecast to be POOR due to PARTICLES
HEALTH MESSAGE: Unhealthy for sensitive people, and could cause symptoms, especially in people with heart or lung disease. https://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/aqms/aqiforecast.htm

Air Quality in October dropped below fair 5 times in the last 7 days of the month
https://airquality.environment.nsw.gov.au/aquisnetnswphp/getMap.php?subreportid=12926011&date=20191101000000
https://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/aqms/aqimonthlygraph.htm

The Department of Health's Guidance on Air Quality

VERY GOOD
0-33
Enjoy activities
GOOD
34-66
Enjoy activities
FAIR
67-99
People unusually sensitive to air pollution:
Plan strenuous outdoor activities when air quality is better
POOR
100-149
AIR POLLUTION HEALTH ALERT
Sensitive Groups: Cut back or reschedule strenuous outdoor activities
VERY POOR
150-200
AIR POLLUTION HEALTH ALERT
Sensitive groups: Avoid strenuous outdoor activities
Everyone: Cut back or reschedule strenuous outdoor activities
HAZARDOUS
200+
AIR POLLUTION HEALTH ALERT
Sensitive groups: Avoid all outdoor physical activities
Everyone: Significantly cut back on outdoor physical activities

 https://www.health.nsw.gov.au/environment/air/Pages/aqi.aspx (viewed 25 Nov 2019)

Did work stop at Westconnex sites?

Level of PM2.5 in the Inner West about 10.55am on Thursday 21 November 2019.
According to the Adapt NSW Website, the effects of climate change will include:

Trend in Greenhouse Gas Emissions across Sectors

Growth in Diesel Consumption



" This demonstration project has found that up to half of the total sulfate air pollution in the greater Sydney region can be attributed to emissions from NSW’s eight coal-fired power stations. Despite being located many kilometres outside of the greater Sydney metropolitan area, these coal-fired power stations have a significant impact on air quality in the CBD areas of Sydney." https://www.ansto.gov.au/news/revealing-sources-of-sydney%E2%80%99s-air-pollution

Trees trap pollutants as well as converting CO2.

"Trees also remove particulate matter from the atmosphere, particularly small particles which are a major health hazard in air pollution. Trees along urban roadways can reduce the presence of fine particulate matter in the atmosphere within a few hundred yards of the roadside verge. The total area of leaves is critical: a few trees with sparse leaves are less effective than a dense canopy. Trees with small or hairy leaves are best at removing particles." https://blog.nature.org/science/2017/04/06/trees-air-pollution-balance-ecosystem-services-ozone/

"The average reduction of particulate matter near a tree is between 7-24%, while the cooling effect is up to 2C (3.6F). There are already tens of millions of people getting those kinds of benefits," https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-37813709

Birch, the best-performing tree, removed 79 percent of these ultrafine particles from the air, while yew and elder each captured around 70 percent. Such trees could be planted at pollution hotspots to quickly improve air quality, the scientists suggest. https://www.the-scientist.com/news-opinion/trees-tested-as-pollutant-traps-65940

Westconnex remove many trees (including casuarinas) from along City West Link and the Crescent and Victoria Road. This combined with the dust and diesel emissions from trucks arriving and leaving from the concrete port and the Rozelle Railyards as well as buses travelling along Victoria Road would have all contributed to the poor air quality that has shown up from the private monitors.

There are official monitors at White Bay Cruise Terminal, in Callan Park at Rozelle and Westconnex is also required to monitor air quality but there is little analysis publically available.

Westconnex Conditions

Should ambient monitoring of air pollutants exceed the following goals, the
provisions of Conditions E32, E33 and E34 will apply:
(a) CO – 8 hour rolling average of 9.0 ppm (NEPM);
(b) NO2 – One hour average of 0.12 ppm (245 μg/m3) (NEPM);
(c) PM10 – 24 hour average of 50 μg/m3 (NEPM);
(d) PM2.5 – 24 hour average of 25 μg/m3 (NEPM);
(e) PM10 – annual average of 25 μg/m3 (NEPM); and
(f) PM2.5 – annual average of 8 μg/m3 (NEPM).
Note: The notification and reporting obligations under conditions E32, E33 and
E34 relating to ambient monitoring will begin at the commencement of
operation of the CSSI. The first annual average concentrations for PM10 and
PM2.5 must be calculated on the first day the project has been in operation for
12 months and on a rolling basis thereafter.



Thursday, November 21, 2019

Air Quality in the Inner West Thursday 21 November 2019.

Air Quality in Sydney approximately 10.55 on Thursday 21 November 2019.

Official AQI US - Hazardous at the Opera House

PM 2.5

PM10

Source: Live Air Quality Monitoring: https://deutschland.maps.luftdaten.info/?fbclid=IwAR3ibr6uLpHCb6zzmb1XDf16D0N6Mv_7OH3XRINTEbPPgFxk5rWlGvh4MHE#14/-33.8872/151.1845

Smog over the city about 3pm on 21 November photo from Johnston Street Annandale

Tech Central Camperdown Health - walking and cycling

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