Monday, July 31, 2023

IWLEP 2022 for parts of Leichhardt, Taverners Hill and Kings Bay precincts in the Parramatta Road Corridor (planning panel 29Mar 2022)

Leichhardt

Appendix 1 –

Proposed LEP maps

March 2022

Contents
Leichhardt

Existing Land Zoning Map ....................................................................................5

Proposed Land Zoning Map ............................................................................. 6

Proposed Heritage Map ........................................................................................7

Existing Floor Space Ratio Map ....................................................................8

Proposed Floor Space Ratio Map .............................................................. 9

Proposed Floor Space Ratio Incentives Map .............................. 10

Existing Height of Buildings Map ................................................................. 11

Proposed Height of Building Incentives Map .............................. 12

Proposed Key Site 1 ...................................................................................................... 13

Proposed Active Frontages Map ................................................................. 14

Proposed Land Use and Transport Integration Map............ 15

Proposed Additional Permitted Uses Map .......................................16

Proposed Opportunity Sites Map ................................................................. 17

Taverners Hill
Existing Land Zoning Map ........................................................................................18

Proposed Land Zoning Map .................................................................................. 19

Proposed Heritage Map ...........................................................................................20

Existing Floor Space Ratio Map ......................................................................... 21

Proposed Floor Space Ratio Incentives Map .................................. 22

Existing Height of Buildings Incentive Map ........................................23

Proposed Height of Building Incentives Map ................................. 24

Proposed Key Site 2.................................................................................................. 25

Proposed Land Use and Transport Integration Map.............. 26

Proposed Additional Permitted Uses Map ...........................................27

Kings Bay

Existing Land Zoning Map ........................................................................................28

Proposed Land Zoning Map ..................................................................................29

Proposed Heritage Map .......................................................................................... 30

Existing Floor Space Ratio Map .......................................................................... 31

Proposed Floor Space Ratio Incentives Map ................................... 32
 

Existing Height of Building Incentives Map .........................................33
Proposed Height of Building Incentives Map .................................. 34

Proposed Key Site 3.................................................................................................. 35

Proposed Active Frontages Map ................................................................. 36

Proposed Land Use and Transport Integration Map ............. 37

Proposed Additional Permitted Uses Map ........................................ 38

Proposed Opportunity Sites Map ................................................................ 39

Leichhardt

Minutes of the Inner West Local Planning Panel Meeting held on 29 March 2022

Leichhardt

Leichhardt

Leichhardt

Leichhardt

Leichhardt

Leichhardt

Leichhardt

Leichhardt

 

This is Page No: 1 of the Minutes of the Inner West Local Planning Panel Meeting held on 29 March 2022
INNER WEST LOCAL PLANNING PANEL
MEETING
29 March 2022
MEETING MINUTES
This is Page No: 2 of the Minutes of the Inner West Local Planning Panel Meeting held on 29 March 2022
MINUTES of INNER WEST LOCAL PLANNING PANEL MEETING held by Microsoft
Teams on 29 March 2022
Present: Adjunct Professor David Lloyd QC, Mr Brian Kirk; Mr John McInerney;
Ms Kath Roach.
Staff Present: Strategic Planning Manager, Acting Team Leader Strategic Planning,
Executive Planner, Senior Strategic Planners, Strategic Planning
Interns and Administration Officer.
Others Present: Clr. Marghanita Da Cruz, Guy Rob and other members of the public.
Meeting commenced: 12:30pm and finished at 12:53pm
** ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF COUNTRY
We acknowledge the Gadigal and Wangal people of the Eora nation on whose Country we
are meeting today, and their Elders past, present and emerging.
** DECLARATION OF PECUNIARY INTERESTS AND NON-PECUNIARY
INTERESTS
There were no declarations of interest.
This is Page No: 3 of the Minutes of the Inner West Local Planning Panel Meeting held on 29 March 2022
Agenda Item 1 Parramatta Road Corridor (Stage 1 LEP Phase 2A)
Description
Planning proposal to amend the draft Inner West Local
Environmental Plan (IWLEP) 2022 for parts of Kings Bay,
Taverners Hill and Leichhardt precincts of the Parramatta Road
Corridor Urban Transformation Strategy (PRCUTS) 2016.
DECISION OF THE PANEL
THAT the Inner West Planning Panel resolved as follows:
1. THAT it supports the Planning Proposal prepared by Inner West Council.
THAT the Planning Proposal prepared by Council officers dated March 2022 to amend the
IWLEP 2022 for parts of Leichhardt, Taverners Hill and Kings Bay precincts in the
Parramatta Road Corridor has sufficient strategic and site-specific merit for submission to
Minister for Planning for a Gateway Determination in accordance with Section 3.34 of the
Environmental Planning & Assessment Act 1979.
Reasons for the recommendation
PART A:
1. The planning proposal generally complies with and gives effect to the Parramatta Road
Urban Transformation Strategy 2016 (having statutory force via Section 9.1 Ministerial
Direction), and in particular the Parramatta Road Corridor Implementation Plan 2016 –
2023.
2. It gives effect to the NSW Government’s Greater Sydney Region Plan 2018, the
Eastern City District Plan 2018, and the NSW Housing Strategy 2021-2022 Action
Plan.
3. It is consistent with the applicable State Environmental Planning Policies, including the
Housing, the Transport and Infrastructure, the Biodiversity and Conservation, and the
Building Sustainability Index (BASIX 2004) policies.
4. It complies with and gives effect to the following Council adopted policies:
• The Inner West 2036 Community Strategic Plan (adopted 2018)
• The Inner West Local Strategic Planning Statement (adopted March 2020)
• The Inner West Local Housing Strategy (adopted March 2020)
• The Inner West Employment and Retail Lands Strategy (adopted September 2020)
• The Inner West Integrated Transport Strategy (adopted March 2020).
PART B Additional Note:
The Panel notes the Planning Proposal relies on commitment from NSW Government to
introduce an on-street rapid transit system along Parramatta Road. This intent is
supported.
The decision of the panel was unanimous.
This is Page No: 4 of the Minutes of the Inner West Local Planning Panel Meeting held on 29 March 2022
Other matters:
It was noted that two members of the public registered to attended and speak at the
meeting. These included one in support relating to active transport and one objection
relating to deviation from the Parramatta Road Corridor Urban Transformation Strategy.
The Panel Chair advised the role of the Panel relating to Planning Proposals was limited to
providing advice to Council that the proposal had sufficient strategic and site-specific merit
to allow it to be sent the Minister of Planning for Gateway Determination in accordance
with Section 3.34 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 and the
Panel’s reasons for that advice.
Gateway Determination involves a review of the Planning Proposal by the Department of
Planning and Environment and the preparation of a report. The report may include
conditions that must be met before public exhibition. In this regard, the Chair advised the
Planning Proposal that will be exhibited may differ from the products reviewed by the Local
Planning Panel and that the formal public exhibition period provides the most appropriate
opportunity for submissions from the public.
The Inner West Planning Panel Meeting finished at 12:53PM
CONFIRMED:
Adjunct Professor David Lloyd QC
Chairperson
29 March 2022
- https://www.innerwest.nsw.gov.au/ArticleDocuments/33223/Minutes%20-%20Inner%20West%20Local%20Planning%20Panel%20Meeting%20-%2029%20March%202022.pdf.aspx


Kings Bay

Kings Bay

Kings Bay

Kings Bay

Kings Bay

Kings Bay
Kings Bay
Kings Bay
Kings Bay
Kings Bay

Kings Bay
Kings Bay

Kings Bay

Kings Bay

Taverner's Hill

Taverner's Hill

Taverner's Hill

Taverner's Hill
Taverner's Hill

Taverner's Hill

Taverner's Hill

Taverner's Hill



Thursday, July 27, 2023

Development of Flood Plains (Extraordinary Council Meeting 13 December 2022)

 C1222(2) Item 19         Notice of Motion: Development of Flood Plains

Motion: (Da Cruz)

That Council:

 1.    Acknowledges the serious risk that flooding presents to communities in an era of changing climate;

2.    Fully supports the measures already incorporated into IWC plans and strategies to protect communities in the Inner West from flooding risks, especially through the diligent application of those measures in planning decisions; and

3.    Not support any planning proposal which has the effect of significantly increasing residential density in mapped flood planning areas.

The Mayor ruled point 3 of the motion out of order as it is inconsistent with the exemptions allowed in the ministerial directions and also ruled points 1 and 2 redundant as council does not need to move a motion to support the measures already incorporated into Inner West Council plans and strategies.

Procedural Motion (Da Cruz/Stamolis)

That a motion of dissent be raised regarding the Chairperson’s ruling.

Motion Lost

For Motion:                 Crs Da Cruz, Langford and Stamolis

Against Motion:          Crs Atkins, Byrne, D'Arienzo, Drury, Griffiths, Howard, Lockie, Scott, Shetty, Smith, Stephens and Tsardoulias

Minutes of Extraordinary Council Meeting held remotely and livestreamed on Council’s website on 13 December 2022 https://innerwest.infocouncil.biz/Open/2022/12/C_13122022_MIN_4000_EXTRA_WEB.htm

AGENDA R


Extraordinary Council Meeting

13 December 2022

 

Item No:         C1222(2) Item 19

Subject:         Notice of Motion: Development of Flood Plains       

Council Meeting at its meeting on 06 December 2022 resolved that the matter be deferred to the meeting to be held on 13 December 2022.   

From:             Councillor Marghanita Da Cruz  

 

 

Motion:

 

That Council:

 

1.   Acknowledges the serious risk that flooding presents to communities in an era of changing climate;

 

2.   Fully supports the measures already incorporated into IWC plans and strategies to protect communities in the Inner West from flooding risks, especially through the diligent application of those measures in planning decisions; and

 

3.   Consider planning proposals that are in accordance with the relevant planning legislation regarding resilience and hazards, and that are commensurate with flood behaviour and include consideration of the potential flood impacts both on and off the subject land.

 

Background

 

Council has long recognised that flooding represents a significant risk to Inner West residents and communities. Prior to the merger, the former constituent Councils were among the more advanced councils in their flood planning.

 

The risks posed by floods have increased significantly as a consequence of our changing climate. Council has responded to the threat by making planning for hazards and climate change its No.1 planning priority in our Local Strategic Planning Statement.(1)

A recent, peer reviewed article published in the international journal, Science, looked at 20 year records for Sydney rainfall. It found that dangerous flash flooding was increasing much faster than previously expected.  The abstract states:

 

Short-duration, extreme rainfall can cause dangerous flash flooding, threatening life, infrastructure and the landscape. Studies of this type of event have focused mainly on daily rain totals, not considering how precipitation might vary on shorter time scales. Ayat et al. analyzed sub-hourly rainfall extremes near Sydney, Australia, over 20 years and found that they are increasing much faster than those over longer periods. Better understanding of such extremes is vital for effective climate adaptation and to reduce the vulnerability of populated regions.(2)

 

The Sydney Morning Herald reported the findings saying:

 

Extreme and potentially dangerous bursts of rain have intensified by an “alarming” 40 per cent in Sydney over the past two decades, with climate researchers flagging major implications for how cities deal with flash-flooding and drainage.(3)

 

The need to take flood risks seriously is reflected at every level of planning.

 

The Eastern City District Plan states:

 

Planning for population growth and change needs to consider exposure at a local level as well as cumulative impacts at district and regional levels…..In planning for growth, consideration of natural hazards and cumulative impacts include avoiding locating growth and development in areas exposed to natural hazards and limiting growth in existing communities that are exposed and vulnerable to natural hazards. In exceptional circumstances, there may be a need to reduce the number of people and amount of property that are vulnerable to natural hazards, through managed retreat of development”(4)

 

The Ministerial Direction under s.9.1(2) of the Environmental Planning & Assessment Act  1979 dealing with resilience and hazards, being Direction 4.1  Flooding, provides that:

 

            (3) A planning proposal must not contain provisions that apply to a flood planning area which:

 

(a) permit development in floodway areas;

(b) permit development that will result in significant flood impacts to other properties;

(c) permit development for the purpose of residential accommodation in high hazard areas;

(d) permit a significant increase in the development and/or dwelling density of that land…

 

Council’s own Housing Strategy notes:

 

Flooding was also considered a constraint. Figure 27 [which shows Council’s flood planning areas] illustrates the locations that are subject to flooding.  While this does not prohibit development in many cases, areas that are subject to flooding may not be suitable for substantial uplift as a result of evacuation requirements.  Similarly, flood impacts may require built form modifications to address risk, which may not optimise urban design outcomes.(5)

 

Similar restrictions and warnings are found in the Inner West LEP at clause 5.21, in the State Government’s Floodplain Development Manual, in Planning Circular PS 21-006, and in the Report of the 2022 NSW Flood Inquiry, as well as a great many other documents.

 

However, despite all the well-meaning statements, strategies, plans and polices around the importance of flood planning, it seems that some sections of government (and this Council) are still reluctant to treat the matter with the seriousness and consideration that our plans demand.  Hence this motion to re-emphaise what should be plain to all – that the impacts of climate change are real and that we must treat them seriously, especially in how we plan our area. 

 

Endnotes

(1)  Inner West Local Strategic Planning Statement March 2020 p.32 Item 1.1.

(2) “Intensification of Subhourly Heavy Rainfall” Hooman Ayat, Jason Evans, Steven Sherwood & Joshua Soderholm, Science Vol 378 No.6620 November 2022.

(3) SMH Extreme rain deluges Intensifying over Sydney, study finds. Michael Koziol 11 November 2022

(4) Eastern City District Plan March 2018 Greater Sydney Commission p.118-119

(5 )Our Inner West Housing Strategy March 2020 p.111

 

Officer’s Comments:

 

No further comments were required for this Notice of Motion.

 

ATTACHMENTS

Nil.


https://innerwest.infocouncil.biz/Open/2022/12/C_13122022_AGN_4000_AT_EXTRA_WEB.htm

Extraordinary Council Meeting

13 December 2022

 

Congratulate Boomali Aboriginal Artists Cooperative on 35 Years (Extraordinary Council Meeting 13 December 2022)


Extraordinary Council Meeting

13 December 2022

C1222(2) Item 18         Notice of Motion: Congratulate Boomali Aboriginal Artists          Cooperative on 35 Years

Motion: (Da Cruz/Byrne)

That Council write to the artists of Boomalli Aboriginal Artists Cooperative congratulating them on their contribution to culture in Leichhardt, the Inner West and beyond.

Motion Carried

For Motion:                 Crs Atkins, Byrne, Da Cruz, D'Arienzo, Drury, Griffiths, Howard, Langford, Lockie, Scott, Shetty, Smith, Stamolis, Stephens and Tsardoulias

Against Motion:          Nil

 Minutes https://innerwest.infocouncil.biz/Open/2022/12/C_13122022_MIN_4000_EXTRA_WEB.htm

Agenda Item No:         C1222(2) Item 18

Subject:         Notice of Motion: Congratulate Boomali Aboriginal Artists Cooperative on 35 Years       

Council Meeting at its meeting on 06 December 2022 resolved that the matter be deferred to the meeting to be held on 13 December 2022.   

From:             Councillor Marghanita Da Cruz  

 

 

Motion:

 

That Council write to the artists of Boomalli Aboriginal Artists Cooperative congratulating them on their contribution to culture in Leichhardt, the Inner West and beyond.

 

Background

 

 

Boomalli Aboriginal Artists Co-operative was established in 1987 by Euphemia Bostock, Fiona Foley, Michael Riley (dec.), Tracey Moffatt, Jeffrey Samuels, Bronwyn Bancroft, Avril Quaill, Fern Martens, Arone Meeks and Brenda L. Croft.

 

“These ten Artists were striving for recognition from the mainstream art society and their diversity was unparalleled. They challenged preconceptions around urban-based Aboriginal Artists and created a unique space for themselves within the art world. 

 

The Co-operative's existence and continued longevity has been an enabler for hundreds of Aboriginal Artists. “ Read more at Boomalli Website https://www.boomalli.com.au/about-1/

Boomalli is located at 55-59 Flood St Leichhardt, their PO Box 176 Westgate NSW 2048 from it’s time on Parramatta Road Annandale.

 

According to Wikipedia’s reference to Hinkson, M.; Harris, A. (2010). Aboriginal Sydney: A guide to important places of the past and present Second edition. Aboriginal Studies Press. p. 111. ISBN . Retrieved 16 November 2022 Boomalli has its roots in the National Black Theatre based in Redfern in the 1970s.

 

The work of the founding artists of Boomalli can be found in the NSW Art Gallery and National Gallery of Australia. Blak Douglas aka Adam Hill who won this year’s Archibald Portrait prize has exhibited often at Boomalli.

 

Wally Caruna’s 1993 book “Aboriginal Art” notes the formation of Boomalli following the “ground-breaking” exhibition Koori Art ‘84. Jeffrey Samuel’s work ‘This changing continent of Australia” was acquired by the Art Gallery of NSW. Caruna describes the work of photographers Brenda Croft and the late Michael Riley as presenting a “powerful alternative to the negative stereotypes of Aboriginal People” while Fiona Foley was inspired by more traditional settings of Fraser Island in particular. The book includes images of Euphemia Bostock’s Possum skin print and Bronwyn Bancroft’s Cycle of Life cape.

 

Boomalli's 35th Anniversary Exhibition “Duration” features posters, flyers, photographs and films from 1987 to now. Duration runs 25th November to 28th January 2023. More at https://www.boomalli.com.au/

 

 

Officer’s Comments:

 

No further comments were required for this Notice of Motion.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

Nil.

AGENDA Extraordinary Council Meeting TUESDAY 13 DECEMBER 2022: https://innerwest.infocouncil.biz/Open/2022/12/C_13122022_AGN_4000_AT_EXTRA_WEB.htm

 

Sunday, July 23, 2023

Acoustic Vehicle Alerting Systems for Electric Vehicles

 

Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development, Communications and the Arts, logo of Header menu      Ministers     About us     Media centre     Contact us  DITRDC navigation      Infrastructure, transport & vehicles  Territories, regions & cities Media, communications & arts Research & data      Home     Have your say     Acoustic Vehicle Alerting Systems for Electric Vehicles  Acoustic Vehicle Alerting Systems for Electric Vehicles Listen  We're seeking feedback on whether to have all new light electric road vehicles (including fully electric, hydrogen fuel cell, and hybrid vehicles) fitted with an audio alerting system. Why we want your input Pedestrian safety is important for all Australians. This is your chance to have your say on technology which can help to reduce potential collisions by making it easier to hear electric vehicles travelling at low speeds. How you can voice your opinion Read the Consultation Impact Analysis and tell us what you think. Upload, email or post your submission by 26 May 2023. What will be the outcome of this consultation? Your submission will help to decide whether alerting systems for electric vehicles should be mandated in Australia, and when. The Issue  Electric vehicles generate considerably less noise when compared with vehicles with conventional internal combustion engines. At low speeds, when tyre and wind noise is negligible, it can be harder for pedestrians to hear electric vehicles, increasing the risk of a collision. These collisions can still cause serious injury and death. The risk is exacerbated for pedestrians who are blind or have poor vision, as they generally rely on sound to negotiate the road network independently.July 2023: Silent Electric vehicles pose an additional danger to blind Ashfield resident Gisele Mesnage who relies on her guide dog Nyota... https://cityhubsydney.com.au/2023/07/elderly-residents-locked-out-of-new-ashfield-park-by-lack-of-zebra-crossings/

 
2018: Electric cars in Australia to include safety sound
"Vision Australia welcomes the federal government’s announcement that plans are underway to mandate a minimum sound requirement in electric and hybrid vehicles in Australia." https://www.visionaustralia.org/news/2019-08-30/electric-cars-australia-include-safety-sound
 
May 2023: Acoustic Vehicle Alerting Systems for Electric Vehicles
We're[were] seeking feedback on whether to have all new light electric road vehicles (including fully electric, hydrogen fuel cell, and hybrid vehicles) fitted with an audio alerting system. [This consultation is closed. submission by 26 May 2023.] https://www.infrastructure.gov.au/have-your-say/acoustic-vehicle-alerting-systems-electric-vehicles
 
WikiPedia: "Electric vehicle warning sounds are sounds designed to alert pedestrians to the presence of electric drive vehicles such as hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), and battery electric vehicles (BEVs) travelling at low speeds. Warning sound devices were deemed necessary by some government regulators because vehicles operating in all-electric mode produce less noise than traditional combustion engine vehicles and can make it more difficult for pedestrians and cyclists (especially the blind or short-sighted) to be aware of their presence."...

Monday, July 17, 2023

Cumulative effect of Additional Equipment for Telecom Towers (20 June 2023 Agenda deferred to August Council Meeting)

Telecommunications Deployment

"Telecommunications carriers have powers under Schedule 3 of the Telecommunications Act 1997 to inspect land, install ‘low-impact’ facilities, and to maintain any kind of telecommunications facility. They also have immunity from some state and territory laws when carrying out these activities, such as planning laws.

This is called the carriers’ powers and immunities framework.

The carriers' powers and immunities framework is important as it allows for the efficient construction and maintenance of telecommunications networks in a nationally consistent way.

Low-impact facilities are telecommunications equipment that:

  • are essential to the efficient operation of telecommunications networks
  • have low visual impact, and
  • are unlikely to cause significant community disruption during installation or operation.

These laws encourage telecommunications carriers to roll out networks using components that fall within strict type, size, colour and location limitations. For example, telecommunications companies use these powers to install pillars and antennae used to deliver landline and mobile communications services to the community.

They do not allow for the construction of larger infrastructure, such as free standing telecommunications towers or poles.

Approvals for the installation of free standing telecommunications towers and poles are the responsibility of state, territory and local governments. Planning laws generally require a development application to be submitted to the local council and for the council to consult on the application. The Government is not involved in state, territory and local government planning processes." - The carriers' powers and immunities framewor, viewed 22 July 2023, https://www.infrastructure.gov.au/media-communications-arts/phone/telecommunications-infrastructure-deployment/carriers-powers-and-immunities-framework

eme.gov.au Fact Sheet

Electromagnetic energy.
Researched.
Regulated.
Safe. (fact sheet)

"Australia has strict standards covering acceptable levels of EME from wireless communications. These standards are set by the Australian Radiation Protection andNuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA).
Australia’s strict EME standards were updated by ARPANSA as recently as March 2021, informed by the latest local and international scientific research.
These standards are enforced by the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA). ACMA checks EME compliance through record audits, investigations, site inspections and testing." - Researched, Regulated & Safe, This factsheet explains the research, regulation and safety of EME from telecommunications in Australia,Download PDF (3.5 MB)

"Find out about the safety of telecommunications infrastructure near your home

In 2022, telecommunication and digital connectivity are important parts of everyday life and it’s hard to imagine a world without communications technologies as we know them today.

Our experiences through the pandemic meant access to quality and reliable telecommunications services is more important than ever, keeping us connected with family and friends, and enabling many of us to learn and work from home.  

While our fixed line internet services stood up well to the pandemic, it has been just as important for telecommunications companies to expand and improve their mobile networks to support our increasing need for digital connectivity.

To make this happen, telecommunications companies often need to install new equipment or deploy new infrastructure in our communities so the services can provide effective coverage and capacity where and when we need it.

It is understandable some people are concerned about the electromagnetic energy (EME) emitted by telecommunications infrastructure, particularly when it is installed nearby in our local communities.

The Australian Government strictly regulates EME emissions to protect the health and safety of all members of the public, while allowing the community to benefit from modern telecommunications.

The Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) provides advice to the Australian Government on radiation protection as an independent Government agency that is not affiliated with, or unduly influenced by, the telecommunications industry. In 2021, ARPANSA updated its Standard for Limiting Exposure to Radiofrequency Fields – 100 kHz to 300 GHz (2021) (the Standard), based on the most up-to-date Australian and international peer-reviewed research into EME.

The Standard protects people of all ages and health status against all known adverse health effects from exposure to EME by specifying strict safety limits for exposure levels with which telecommunications services must comply, this includes 5G.

The Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) sets and actively monitors rules for telecommunications companies to follow based on ARPANSA’s Standard so EME is kept at safe levels. In Australia, all telecommunications infrastructure and equipment must comply with these rules and a series of sanctions can be imposed if these rules aren’t followed.

With these measures in place to ensure that EME exposures from telecommunications infrastructure are below the safety limits, there is no extra safety achieved by requiring transmitters to be located any particular distance from residential areas.

So if there is telecommunications infrastructure near you, not only will you be able to access more reliable connectivity but also find comfort in knowing that the technology making that connection possible is researched, regulated and safe.

Find out more at www.eme.gov.au

Further reading:

How we keep communities safe

The Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) is an independent government agency that provides advice to the Government on radiation protection. ARPANSA updated its Standard for Limiting Exposure to Radiofrequency Fields – 100 kHz to 300 GHz (the Standard), based on the most up-to-date Australian and international peer-reviewed research into EME.
The Standard protects people of all ages and health status against all known adverse health effects from exposure to EME by specifying strict safety limits for exposure levels with which telecommunications services must comply, including 5G. -
Telecommunications infrastructure near your home. This factsheet provides information on the rules and regulations that apply when telecommunications infrastructure is deployed in your community.
Document Download PDF(367.56 KB)

Source: https://www.infrastructure.gov.au/media-communications-arts/spectrum/5g-and-eme/resource-hub/fact-sheets-and-infographics#telecommunications (viewed 22 July2023)

Additional Info

Correspondence from Amplitel 19/01/2023 DA/2022/076

Site Reference: 331054 Leichhardt Darley Rd
Date: 19/01/2023
Mr Eric Wong
Senior Planner
Inner West Council
Via Email: eric.wong@innerwest.nsw.gov.au
Dear Eric
DA/2022/0761 Construction of a new mobile base station facility on Lot 1 DP 1262751,
Darley Road LEICHHARDT NSW
On behalf of Amplitel, thank you for providing us the opportunity to address the concerns raised by members of the public during the notification period...Health and Safety EME levels, which are based on safety guidelines recommended by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP), are set by the Australian
Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) and regulated by the Federal Government’s, Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA).
The ACMA’s regulatory arrangements require base stations to comply with the exposure limits set in the relevant Australian safety standard; the Radiation Protection Standard for Limiting Exposure to Radiofrequency Fields – 100 kHz to 300 GHz (2021), known as RPS S-1 or the ARPANSA Standard.
The proposal at Smeeth Road [near Griffith NSW??]has been designed to comply with the relevant Australian safety standard called RPS S-1 or Radiation Protection Series – S1(Standard for Limiting Exposure to Radiofrequency Fields – 100 kHz to 300 GHz). RPS S-1 is set by ARPANSA and is based on the safety guidelines recommended by theInternational Commission on Non-Ionising Radiation Protection (ICNIRP)....

NOM that was  on 20 June 2023 Agenda deferred to August Council Meeting

Item No:         C0623(1) Item 44

Subject:         Notice of Motion: Cumulative effect of Additional Equipment for Telecom Towers           

From:             Councillor Marghanita Da Cruz  

 

 

MOTION

1.   That Council receive a briefing note about proposals for Telecom Towers in our LGA and the regulatory framework.

2.   That Council write to the Minister for Telecommunications, copying local federal members, that our residents have concerns about the initial and cumulative radiation from these towers being placed in our densely populated LGA and to advise what Radiation Safeguards are in place regarding ensuring the cumulative radiation effect of the additional equipment and community consultation are met.

 

Background

 

Council has received applications from Telecommunication Companies to install Towers in our LGA.

Council can only assess the visual impacts of the Towers, not the radiation from the initial equipment being installed on the Towers or cumulative radiation from any additional equipment which is installed in the future.

 

'Phone towers and base stations When telcos want to build or install new equipment near you, there are rules they must follow. '

https://www.acma.gov.au/phone-towers-and-base-stations

 

Officer’s Comments:

 

No further comments were required for this Notice of Motion.

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

Nil.

 

Source: https://innerwest.infocouncil.biz/Open/2023/06/C_20062023_AGN_4010_AT_WEB.htm

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